Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

Latest Resources

Key Takeaways:

  • Support for Biden and Democrats’ new economic plan is vast, with seven in ten Americans in support of it.
  • Lowering prescription drug prices and expanding Medicare to include vision, dental, and hearing coverage are the most broadly supported proposals for new economic legislation.
  • Nearly three in four say it is urgent that the House and Senate pass this legislation.

This post includes a roundup of climate + environment headlines from this week’s public polls, good data points to highlight, and a full roundup with key takeaways from each poll - including new polls on the Build Back Better budget, a study on the impact of language in the natural gas debate, and extreme weather polling.

 

HEADLINES

 

  • Navigator - Specific details engender broad support for the Build Back Better budget, even when it’s framed as a Democratic bill (Release, Slide Deck, Topline)
  • Washington Post/ABC News - The Build Back Better budget has slim majority support when described as $3.5 trillion in spending for “expanded social programs, educational assistance and programs to address climate change” (Topline, Crosstabs)
  • No Labels & American Action Network - Opposition polls claim that Americans want to pause on the kind of government spending included in the Build Back Better budget (Axios Article on No Labels Poll, No Labels Release, American Action Network Release)
  • Yale Program on Climate Change Communication - Language used to describe gas as an energy source is hugely impactful in shaping opinions; Americans have positive attitudes about “natural gas,” but not about methane (Academic Paper, YPCCC Article)
  • Economist/YouGov - Americans continue to attribute recent extreme weather events more to climate change than natural patterns; nearly one in four say they were personally impacted by Eastern seaboard hurricanes (Topline, Crosstabs)

Prompts to help you think through developing a research project, from big-picture strategy to the specifics of a hypothesis.

 

 

 


This is a searchable database & coalition of community-based organizations fighting for climate and environmental justice, who have been directly impacted by "climate change and environmental abuse". It is searchable by impact (flooding, wildfires, water contamination, and air pollution) and resilience strategies such as green infrastructure, renewable energy and affordable housing. The central coalition organization provides "organizing support, scientific and technical guidance, and better access to foundation and government funding" to member-organizations. 92 organizations currently exist in the database/coalition across 32 U.S. states and territories (as of July 2021).


This post includes a roundup of climate + environment headlines from this week’s public polls, good data points to highlight, and a full roundup including key takeaways from each poll.

 

HEADLINES

  • Climate Power + Data for Progress - Voters in moderate U.S. House budget holdouts’ home districts want clean energy and climate investments on top of the infrastructure bill (Release, Topline)
  • POLITICO/Morning Consult - Climate ranks at the top of Democratic voters’ legislative priorities, and there is little backlash to the infrastructure bill (Crosstabs)
  • Navigator - With awareness of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework low, providing basic details still significantly boosts support with all constituencies (Topline)
  • Economist/YouGov - Rising sea levels, extreme heat, and drought continue to be the most widely accepted examples of climate affecting weather today (Topline, Crosstabs)
  • Yale Program on Climate Change Communication - Hot, dry days are more likely to affect Americans’ climate change beliefs than other types of extreme weather (Article, Published Study)
  • Quinnipiac - Half of Floridians think that climate change will negatively impact the state in their lifetimes (Release)

This post includes a roundup of climate + environment headlines from this week’s public polls, good data points to highlight, and a full roundup including key takeaways from each poll.

 

HEADLINES

  • YouGov - Partisanship drives Americans’ perceptions of weather (Article)
  • Navigator - The Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework remains popular (ReleaseSlide Deck)
  • POLITICO/Morning Consult - Renewable energy investment ranks among the most popular provisions in the Build Back Better budget; infrastructure has the public’s attention, but the IPCC report hasn’t broken through (Crosstabs)
  • Data for Progress + Invest in America - Grid modernization is an overwhelmingly popular selling point for the Build Back Better budget (ReleaseTopline)
  • Data for Progress - Voters widely support corporate climate accountability along the lines of the Polluters Pay Climate Fund Act (MemoTopline)

A June 2021 poll found that 57% of Montana voters support the Biden Administration’s American Jobs Plan creating a national path to achieving 100 percent clean electricity by 2035. However, the support is very polarized: 95% of Democrats said they’re supportive, along with 53% of Independents, but just 32% of Republicans. Voters showed similar levels of support when asked about green investments, jobs, and consumer incentives associated with the American Jobs Plan.             


Key Takeaways:

  • The large majority of voters respond favorably to the Build Back Better reconciliation bill when its main elements (including the cost and tax provisions) are presented to them.

  • Most voters say that climate change is responsible for extreme weather events and there is strong majority support for action on climate change. Voters say they are more likely to support the Build Back Better package because of its provisions on clean energy, climate change, and environmental justice.

  • The provisions of the package that lower costs for working families and seniors, including energy costs, are important to swing voters and offer a winning response to criticisms that the Build Back Better package will fuel inflation.

  • There also is a winning rebuttal to the “tax-and-spend” criticism of the package, focusing on the facts that (a) the legislation would be paid for by making the wealthy and multinational corporations pay their fair share; (b) no one under $400,000 will pay more in taxes; and (c) the long-term benefits will outweigh the costs because the proposed investments will grow the economy, create jobs, and help tackle climate change.

 

(This poll was collected by the Environmental Polling Consortium. If you would like to learn more about the EPC and receive weekly polling insights, please contact epc@partnershipproject.org)


This post includes a roundup of climate + environment headlines from this week’s public polls, good data points to highlight, and a full roundup including key takeaways from each poll.

HEADLINES

  • Climate Power + LCV - Investments in clean energy, climate action, and environmental justice bolster support for the reconciliation bill; the most persuasive messages focus on economic aspects including how the bill will lower costs for households (Slide Deck)
  • Climate Power + Data for Progress - Voters support a range of climate-related proposals that were left out of the bipartisan infrastructure bill, especially clean electricity incentives, investments in energy efficiency, and investments in solar and wind (ReleaseMemoTopline)
  • POLITICO + Morning Consult - Voters continue to back the bipartisan infrastructure bill, especially investments in roads, bridges, and water infrastructure; voters are more split on the reconciliation package, but overwhelmingly support expanded home care for the elderly and disabled (ToplineCrosstabs)
  • Data for Progress - Voters think that oil and gas companies have too much power, especially after learning about comments made by a senior Exxon lobbyist; “oil and gas companies” are a more compelling villain than “fossil fuel companies” (ReleaseTopline)
  • Yale Program on Climate Change Communication + George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication - Petition signing is the most appealing ask to get voters involved in climate advocacy, and there is clear interest in community preparedness groups (SummaryFull Report)

Key Takeaways:

  • Seven in ten say climate change is a major crisis or problem.
  • Nearly half of Americans say their community's weather this summer differs from that of past summers, including hotter weather caused by climate change.
  • A rebuttal focused on the daily impacts felt from climate change is more effective than focusing on casualties and extreme weather when responding to those who say we shouldn't invest in tackling climate change.

Links: ArticleSlide Deck, & Full Topline

(This poll was collected by the Environmental Polling Consortium. If you would like to learn more about the EPC and receive weekly polling insights, please contact epc@partnershipproject.org)