Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Poll: The Economist + YouGov

The Economist + YouGov
Research & Articles
01-03-2023

President Biden starts the year with mixed ratings on his handling of climate change and the environment (40% approve to 43% disapprove). More Americans name climate change and the environment as the single “most important issue” to them (66%) than any other issue aside from inflation/prices (90%), health care (89%), and the economy/jobs (91%).

Research & Articles
01-01-2023

Based on political narratives in 2022, here are some key narrative predictions for 2023: the tension between American identity and personal identity, the ongoing erosion of trust in institutions, a lack of certainty about the future, precarity versus safety, and the type of experiences we are dreaming about in our communities and our lives. Some narratives within “American identity crisis” include “What is America?”, “Who is American?”, “The expanded self,” “Identity used to divide or unite,” “The never-ending woke wars,” and “Generational divides.” Some narratives within “Erosion of trust” include “Everything is broken,” “Ongoing attacks on media and journalism,” “The return of the moderate,” and “Taking care of us.” Other narrative categories include “Multipolar world,” “Big tech lives, big tech dies,” “Search for stability,” and “Experience and authenticity.”

Innovation Hub

The Partnership Project
Research & Articles
01-01-2023

The Innovation Hub is here to empower data learning and strategy among environmental organizations. The Partnership project works directly with data strategists and communications teams at partner organizations to assess common needs and opportunities that can be met with data, and designs original research and experiments, pilot new methods and data tools, and highlight innovative projects. This website share what is being learned through case studies and playbooks, webinars and meetups, newsletters. Workstreams include “extreme weather insights and targeting,” “GOTV and civic engagement,” “membership match resources,” “more insights and data.”

Research & Articles
01-01-2023

Climate and the environment rose as public priorities in the second half of 2022, and now rank as the top issue area for Democrats. More Americans name climate change or the environment top-of-mind as priorities for the government in 2023 than any other issues aside from the economy, inflation, and immigration. This follows up on previous AP-NORC polling from September that showed that more than three-fifths of Americans believe the government isn’t doing enough to reduce climate change, demonstrating that the public wants further climate action above and beyond the Inflation Reduction Act. Climate and the environment regularly ranked among the very top tier of Democratic voters’ issue priorities throughout 2022, and the new AP-NORC poll finds that climate/environment is now Democrats’ clear top priority when they are prompted to name the most important issues for the government to address.

Nebraska Rural Poll

University of Nebraska
Research & Articles
01-01-2023

Rural Nebraskans are concerned about extreme weather and climate change but aren’t convinced about proposed climate solutions. 59% of rural Nebraskans agree that we have a responsibility to future generations to reduce the effects of climate change. 55% of rural Nebraskans are concerned about severe droughts. 52% of rural Nebraskans recognize that human activity is contributing to climate change.

The majority of Texas voters recognize that climate change is happening, and pluralities say that the state government and businesses aren’t doing enough to address it. 62% of Texas voters recognize that climate change is happening, while just 23% deny it. Texas voters are more than twice as likely to say that the state government is doing too little to address climate change (41%) as to say that the state government is doing too much (16%).

Younger Americans are growing more worried about global warming

Jennifer Marlon, Seth Rosenthal, Matthew Goldberg, Matthew Ballew, Edward Maibach, John Kotcher and Anthony Leiserowitz. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication
Research & Articles
12-15-2022

Since 2012, global warming acceptance and worry have increased faster among younger Americans aged 18-34 compared to older Americans. More young adults today accept that global warming is happening (+13% points from 68% in 2012 to 81% in 2022) and already harming the U.S. (+24% from 40% in 2012 to 64% in 2022). Further, conservative Republicans consistently remain the least worried—the gap in worry about global warming between liberal/moderate and conservative Republicans has grown by 7% points in the last decade (from a difference of 32% points in 2012 to 39% points in 2022) and 12% points in the last five years (from a difference of 27% points in 2012 to 39% points in 2022). There is also increased political polarization in climate policy support over the last five years—conservative Republicans are much less supportive of funding research into renewable energy today (52% in 2022) than they were in five years ago (71% in 2017), and the difference in support between liberal/moderate and conservative Republicans has grown by 10% points (from a difference of 15% points in 2017 to 25% points in 2022). These findings and more come from the latest release of Climate Change in the American Mind (CCAM) data and the update to interactive data visualization tool, the CCAM Explorer. The data and tool include two additional years of public opinion about climate change (2008-2022) and enable anyone to explore Americans’ beliefs, risk perceptions, policy support, and behaviors over time and by different demographic groups.

Arizonans want additional investment on top of the Inflation Reduction Act to boost clean energy in the state, and overwhelmingly believe that the clean energy transition will benefit the state economy. 72% of Arizona voters agree that using more clean energy like wind and solar would create quality jobs and strengthen Arizona's economy. 66% of Arizona voters agree that using more clean energy like wind and solar would save Arizona families money. Majorities of Arizona voters say that the state should be using more energy from solar (74%) and wind (59%), while few want to see the state use more energy from fossil gas (15%), oil (13%), or coal (10%).

Climate change was one of the top reasons why AAPI voters supported Democratic candidates in the midterms. Climate change and the environment is the issue area that AAPI voters were most likely to say was a reason to vote for Democrats in the midterm elections (64% said this, compared to 61% saying “quality health care and prescription drugs”, 60% saying Roe v. Wade, and more).

Research & Articles
12-06-2022

Voters are worried that climate change will increase the cost of living, but have hope that the expansion of renewables will bring down energy costs. 69% of all likely voters believe that climate change effects will increase costs for consumers. 70% of Americans believe that expanding renewable energy production, like wind and solar power, will bring energy costs down (including 88% of Democrats and 53% of Republicans).