Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Climate Change in the American Mind: Beliefs & Attitudes, Fall 2023

Anthony Leiserowitz, Edward Maibach, Seth Rosenthal, et al. Yale Program on Climate
Research & Articles
01-11-2024

Steady majorities of Americans say that global warming is happening, caused by humans, and affecting the weather. If they could talk to global warming experts, Americans are particularly eager to learn about specific actions that countries like the U.S. can take to address the problem. 72% of Americans recognize that global warming is happening, while just 15% say that it isn’t. Americans are twice as likely to say that global warming is caused mostly by humans (58%) than to say that global warming is caused mostly by natural changes in the environment (29%).

Americans strongly support the recently announced American Climate Corps. The new American Climate Corps is a major step in the fight for our nation’s future and for a Green New Deal. The American Climate Corps is overwhelmingly popular across age and political party, and supported by 71 percent of voters — including more than half of Republicans. The support grows even stronger among voters under the age of 59.

Environmental Polling Roundup - January 5th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
01-05-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including recent polling on climate and clean energy policies, international action on climate change, electric vehicle manufacturing, and Americans’ top issue priorities for 2024.

Research & Articles
01-01-2024

This resource is a trusted source for current research and thinking on how psychological factors drive the climate crisis, how the worsening crisis affects us psychologically, and what we can do about it. You can browse Ecopsychepedia entries by one of our nine themes: Denial, Climate Emotions, Equality and Justice, the Power of Culture, Nature as Healer, Relationships, Resilience and Regeneration, Mental Health Impacts, and Success Stories.

Anger Monitor 2.0

MindWorks
Research & Articles
01-01-2024

The Anger Monitor helps harness and redirect anger for positive impact. MindWorks measures the changing quality and quantity of anger to help advocates and organizers understand and leverage this emotion in campaigns. Anger can be destructive, often exploited by populists or extremists for their own agendas. However, it can also be constructive. Many historic social movements were built on anger.

Environmental Polling Roundup - December 15th, 2023

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
12-15-2023

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling about U.S. climate goals and policies, new polling on polluter accountability, new data from Yale + GMU’s “Global Warming's Six Americas” study, and new findings about young Americans and climate change in the 2024 election.

Poll: Concern for Climate Change Directly Informs Youth Civic Engagement

Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University
Research & Articles
12-14-2023

Young people who feel threatened by climate change and want government action are highly motivated to vote. Untapped potential among the 4 in 10 youth who believe in their ability to have influence on the climate issue: The largest group of youth identified in our analysis (40%) do not currently report being directly affected by climate change, but believe they have the ability to have influence on this issue. However, they are participating in civic actions (both on climate and other issues) at lower rates than other youth. These youth are more likely to be Black, from lower income households, and younger. A majority of youth (56%) do not identify as strongly Republican or strongly Democratic, and many are still undecided who they will vote for: Party affiliation and vote choice for two of the groups align with each of the two major parties. However, many unaffiliated youth were found across all groups, and in the two remaining groups that are not strongly Republican nor strongly Democratic, many youth are still undecided who they will vote for in the 2024 presidential election.

Global Warming’s Six Americas, Fall 2023

Anthony Leiserowitz, Edward Maibach, Seth Rosenthal, John Kotcher, Emily Goddard, Jennifer Carman, Marija Verner, Matthew Ballew, Jennifer Marlon, Sanguk Lee, Teresa Myers, Matthew Goldberg, Nicholas Badullovich and Kathryn Thier. Yale Program on Climate
Research & Articles
12-14-2023

A growing majority of Americans are “Alarmed” or “Concerned” about global warming. Over the past ten years, the Alarmed have grown more than any other audience, nearly doubling in size from 15% in 2013 to 28% in 2023 (+13 percentage points). Conversely, the Cautious have decreased in size the most during that time, from 26% in 2013 to 15% in 2023 (-11 percentage points). Additionally, the percentage of Americans who are either Alarmed or Concerned has increased from 40% in 2013 to 56% in 2023 (+16 percentage points). The Disengaged and Dismissive audiences have remained relatively similar in size over the last decade.

Nearly two-thirds of voters support legislation to make polluters pay for climate damages. Roughly three-quarters of voters (66% support / 26% oppose) support a bill that would require oil and gas companies to pay a share of the cost of climate damages caused by their pollution. This “polluters pay” legislation also attracts support from across the political spectrum, with nearly nine in ten Democrats (88%), three in five independents (61%), and close to half of Republicans (46%) in favor of it. The poll additionally finds that there are clear electoral benefits for political candidates who make “polluters pay” legislation a priority. More than three in five voters (64%) say that they are more likely to support a candidate for office who will prioritize a policy to make oil and gas companies pay a share of the cost of climate damages caused by their pollution, including 89% of Democrats, 58% of independents, and 42% of Republicans.

The method behind Just Stop Oil’s madness

Sam Light. Waging Nonviolence
Research & Articles
12-12-2023

The climate group that threw soup on a Van Gogh knows they annoy you, but that might be part of why their controversial approach works. Contrary to many of these criticisms, there is also a large body of academic literature arguing that radical activism could be beneficial for the environmental movement as a whole. More recently, several polls and surveys have shown that the use of disruptive radical tactics can increase awareness of key issues and generate support for more moderate groups in the same movement. Other studies show that radical tactics are effective when they are contrasted with a set of moderate demands that the government can easily adopt. This article interviewed 12 members from around the U.K., asking how radical flank effects function when applied outside the ivory tower of academia.