Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Making a Clean Energy Future an Equitable One

The Climate Advocacy Lab with the Regulatory Assistance Project
Tips & How-Tos
11-19-2020

In this webinar, the Lab team is joined by the Regulatory Assistance Project to explore recommendations from the new report Energy Infrastructure: Sources of Inequities and Policy Solutions for Improving Community Health and Wellbeing.

In addition to the report, participants also learn from advocates across the country fighting for an equitable clean energy future. Contributing speakers shared their reflections and lessons learned from a variety of perspectives on what it takes to achieve energy equity, including how they're financing low-income solar, how they're growing solar through state-level policy, and how to work in strong coalition.

Contributing speakers include: Donna Brutkoski, Communications Associate, Regulatory Assistance Project; Yesenia Rivera, Director of Energy Equity and Inclusion, Solar United Neighbors; and Jacqueline Hutchinson, Vice President of Operations, People’s Community Action Corporation.

How does the American public perceive climate disasters?

Lauren Kim, Jennifer Marlon, Matthew Ballew, and Karine Lacroix (Yale Program on Climate Change Communication)
Research & Articles
08-23-2020

Different parts of the country see various kinds of extreme weather as most concerning, perceptions which are largely in line with actual major disasters that have occurred in those regions. This report provides concern profiles for the 18 largest states, drawing on survey data from 2018 and 2019. Over half of Americans see such extreme weather events posting a high or moderate risk to their community in the coming decade, and two thirds see a climate link to US weather (though only a third think climate affects our weather "a lot").

Poll: A majority of Ohio voters oppose HB 6 and want to see it repealed

OEC Action Fund, Ohio Conservative Energy Forum, and NRDC Action Fund
Research & Articles
08-20-2020

A majority of Ohio voters (64%) oppose HB 6 and want to see it repealed. Support for repeal increases 12 points as voters hear more information.

6 out of 10 voters agree that climate change is an urgent threat. 

Voters support the pillars of a repeal and replacement plan, including investigating FirstEnergy, a zero-carbon energy future, and an equity focused move to clean energy.

7 out of 10 voters say they are likely to sign a petition to place HB6 on the ballot for repeal if the Legislature does not repeal it themselves.

Energy Infrastructure: Sources of Inequities and Policy Solutions for Improving Community Health and Wellbeing

Regulatory Assistance Project, Synapse Energy Economics, & Community Action Partnership
Research & Articles
04-28-2020

In a new report produced with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Synapse Energy Economics, RAP and Community Action Partnership take an in-depth look at the disparate impacts of electric and natural gas infrastructure on economic, social, and health outcomes — and consider how to ensure that a clean-energy future is a more equitable future.

Poll: Americans on Clean Power

Voice of the People and University of Maryland, School of Public Policy
Research & Articles
08-31-2016

3 in 4 respondents said that it is a high priority to cut air pollution from energy production that has negative public health effects, including a slight majority of Republicans and 90% of Democrats. 7 in 10 said it is a high priority to reduce greenhouse gases from energy production, including just under half of Republicans and 91% of Democrats. After a briefing and assessment of arguments pro and con, 7 in 10 approved of the US participating in the Paris Climate Agreement.

Battleground Millennial Survey

NextGen Climate/Project New America
Research & Articles
07-26-2016

75% of millennials say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate who wants to transition the U.S. from fossil fuels to clean energy, but 44% of millennials do not see a difference between Clinton and Trump on this issue. 44% also prefer Clinton’s views on transitioning to clean energy; only 12% prefer Trump’s.