Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Environmental Polling Roundup - January 13th, 2023

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
01-13-2023

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including national polling about climate change and its impacts, national polling about extreme weather and congressional action on climate change, and new polling in New York State about the proposed end of gas hookups in new construction projects.

Americans overwhelmingly say that they want their member of Congress to support efforts to fight climate change. 71% of Americans want their representative in Congress to support efforts to fight climate change. 67% of Americans who report that their area has experienced more extreme weather in recent years say that the experience has made them more concerned about climate change.

Voters Support New York’s Proposal to End Fossil Fuels in New Construction

Sabrina Jacobs and Kevin Hanley. Data for Progress
Research & Articles
01-09-2023

Most New York State voters support the end of gas in new construction projects. 66% of New York State voters support ending gas in new construction projects (including 85% of Democrats and 43% of Republicans). Fewer than 50% of New Yorkers believe their political leaders have done enough to address climate change. More New Yorkers are concerned about “the cost of home energy bills” (85%) than “climate change” (74%) or “the air quality in their residence” (55%).

Most voters recognize that there’s a connection between natural disasters and climate change, but Democrats and Republicans disagree on the topic. Further, voters are not familiar with racial disparities in climate impacts. 62% of voters agree that climate change presents a threat to Americans’ health. 60% of voters agree that climate change is a “crisis” (including 87% of Democrats but just 30% of Republicans). 63% of Democrats believe that communities of color are more adversely affected by climate change, but only 17% of Republicans do. 44% of voters are “a lot” or “somewhat” motivated to switch to cleaner energy in their home after learning about the Inflation Reduction Act investments (including 65% of Democrats and just 27% of Republicans). 60% of voters recognize that the frequency of natural disasters has increased in recent years. 59% of voters recognize that there is a “very” or “somewhat” strong relationship between natural disasters and climate change.

Environmental Polling Roundup - January 6th, 2023

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
01-06-2023

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on climate change as an issue priority, President Biden’s handling of climate change and environmental issues, and the establishment of a Civilian Climate Corps.

Poll: A Civilian Climate Corps Is Broadly Popular

Abby Springs. Data for Progress
Research & Articles
01-05-2023

Voters continue to overwhelmingly support the creation of a Civilian Climate Corps. Voters support the establishment of a Civilian Climate Corps by a 63%-24% margin after reading a brief, one-sentence description of the proposal. After reading arguments for and against the idea, voters support President Biden establishing a Civilian Climate Corps through executive order by a 52%-37% margin.

Poll: The Economist + YouGov

The Economist + YouGov
Research & Articles
01-03-2023

President Biden starts the year with mixed ratings on his handling of climate change and the environment (40% approve to 43% disapprove). More Americans name climate change and the environment as the single “most important issue” to them (66%) than any other issue aside from inflation/prices (90%), health care (89%), and the economy/jobs (91%).

Research & Articles
01-01-2023

Based on political narratives in 2022, here are some key narrative predictions for 2023: the tension between American identity and personal identity, the ongoing erosion of trust in institutions, a lack of certainty about the future, precarity versus safety, and the type of experiences we are dreaming about in our communities and our lives. Some narratives within “American identity crisis” include “What is America?”, “Who is American?”, “The expanded self,” “Identity used to divide or unite,” “The never-ending woke wars,” and “Generational divides.” Some narratives within “Erosion of trust” include “Everything is broken,” “Ongoing attacks on media and journalism,” “The return of the moderate,” and “Taking care of us.” Other narrative categories include “Multipolar world,” “Big tech lives, big tech dies,” “Search for stability,” and “Experience and authenticity.”

Innovation Hub

The Partnership Project
Research & Articles
01-01-2023

The Innovation Hub is here to empower data learning and strategy among environmental organizations. The Partnership project works directly with data strategists and communications teams at partner organizations to assess common needs and opportunities that can be met with data, and designs original research and experiments, pilot new methods and data tools, and highlight innovative projects. This website share what is being learned through case studies and playbooks, webinars and meetups, newsletters. Workstreams include “extreme weather insights and targeting,” “GOTV and civic engagement,” “membership match resources,” “more insights and data.”

Research & Articles
01-01-2023

Climate and the environment rose as public priorities in the second half of 2022, and now rank as the top issue area for Democrats. More Americans name climate change or the environment top-of-mind as priorities for the government in 2023 than any other issues aside from the economy, inflation, and immigration. This follows up on previous AP-NORC polling from September that showed that more than three-fifths of Americans believe the government isn’t doing enough to reduce climate change, demonstrating that the public wants further climate action above and beyond the Inflation Reduction Act. Climate and the environment regularly ranked among the very top tier of Democratic voters’ issue priorities throughout 2022, and the new AP-NORC poll finds that climate/environment is now Democrats’ clear top priority when they are prompted to name the most important issues for the government to address.