Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

Latest Resources

This tool shows which issues are most salient in which congressional districts, using Google search data. The tool allows users to search by issue (e.g., abortion, gas prices) and by congressional district. The current data online is from June 6-13, and jobs, taxes, gas prices, firearms, and wages are receiving the “most interest,” while abortion is receiving “medium interest.” Users can see issue salience/interest by absolute or relative interest.


Environmental Polling Roundup - June 10th, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
06-10-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new national polling on climate change, plastic pollution, and the seafood industry as well as new state polling in Texas about the state’s energy policies. 


Residents, community organizations, and health care practitioners organized for over a decade to protect the health of residents on the front lines of urban oil extraction in L.A. In January 2022, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to draft an ordinance to prohibit all new oil and gas drilling and to phase out existing drilling operations throughout the City of Los Angeles. This resource is based on an interview with Wendy Miranda (she/they), a community leader with Communities for a Better Environment (CBE) and resident, about the historic victory. The organizing strategy to get this victory involved various lobbying efforts, rallies, press conferences, petition collections, a wide range of community/organization endorsements, phone banking, and social media outreach. Overall, frontline residents providing public comments and sharing their personal experiences were some of the strongest and most powerful tactics. STAND L.A. will continue to be part of the process to help draft an ordinance and direct the City of Los Angeles on how to lead a genuine community participation process. Miranda shares that this victory is proof that frontline communities can lead the change toward a just, equitable transition to a clean energy future.


Values-Based Organizing Training

Michael MacMiller and Jabari Brooks, Partnership for Southern Equity
Tips & How-Tos
06-09-2022

In this training, you will glean insights from Partnership for Southern Equity and their values-based organizing model, contextualized by their short film The 4th Arm which explores how centering values and lived experience is critical to the work of organizing and central to our ability to achieve energy and climate justice. This training will help you:

  • Develop the skills necessary to be an effective community organizer 
  • Gain an understanding of value-based community organizing
  • Deepen your understanding of allyship and allies
  • Explore what it means to build power and "systems change"

Most California voters want to see the state address climate change “immediately”, and climate change is by far the top issue for California Democrats. The poll found that an outright majority (55%) believe that California should take action on climate change “immediately,” while just one-fifth (20%) believe that the state can wait instead of acting immediately and just one-quarter (25%) oppose climate action over the next few years. The poll also found that climate is a uniquely important issue for Democratic voters in particular: 57% of Democratic voters in California say that climate and the environment are among their top three issue priorities, “twice as high as any other issue.” Additionally, even in the midst of high inflation and economic unease, the poll shows that California voters prefer a candidate who is focused on climate change and the environmental issues facing the state over a fossil fuel-backed candidate who sets these issues aside in order to focus on the economy.


Research & Articles
06-08-2022

New Orleans is in the midst of a green infrastructure revolution. In smaller neighborhoods like Hoffman Triangle, residents are leading the way, house by house, block by block. Year-round, New Orleanians deal with a chronic kind of inundation researchers vaguely call “urban flooding.” The goal of “nature-based” (green infrastructure) solutions is to reduce the pressure on pipes and pumps by using landscaping to slow the flow of water. Projects can store water so it soaks into the soil or slowly flows into a storm drain at a rate the system can handle. Plants can also absorb water into their roots, leaching out pollutants in the process. They also come with various added benefits like improved water quality, mosquito control, and increased open space to cool the sweltering Louisiana air. The Urban Conservancy is one organization in particular doing lots of work on nature-based infrastructure in New Orleans.


Research & Articles
06-07-2022

Most Americans consider sustainability an important factor when purchasing meat or seafood, and a clear majority support increasing seafood traceability. This new poll, released in advance of World Oceans Day (June 8th), finds that Americans widely value sustainability and transparency on the part of seafood suppliers. Among those who consume meat and seafood, 70% say that sustainability is an important consideration for them when purchasing meat and seafood products. Most also say that the country of processing (65%) and country of origin (61%) are important factors. Additionally, majorities of consumers say that human rights abuses and illegal practices would impact their seafood purchasing decisions if they learned about them: 65% say they would be more confident buying from a company if they knew it has a traceability program to avoid human rights abuses. 60% say they would be less likely to purchase seafood if slave labor was used to catch the fish. 58% say they would be less likely to purchase seafood if it was collected in an illegal manner. The idea of increasing traceability in the seafood supply chain is also popular, as 72% support increasing the traceability of seafood and 63% believe that increased traceability will increase the freshness of seafood.


What’s Your Power Analysis?

Deepak Pateriya. The Forge
Research & Articles
06-06-2022

This new series at The Forge will engage organizers with a deceptively simple question: what’s your power analysis? Powerful actors and institutions are creating and purposefully maintaining unjust political and economic systems for their own benefit. This article series aims for sharper and more shared approaches and language across our movements for describing, measuring, and analyzing power. In this series, this author will talk to organizers and movement leaders — including Doran Schrantz of Faith in Minnesota, Andrea Mercado of Florida Rising, leaders at the New Georgia Project Action Fund, and others from across the progressive movement — about the power analysis that guides their work and their organizations, the power they’re trying to build and exercise, how it’s going, and how they know.


Research & Articles
06-06-2022

Delivering more political information to voters makes them vote more. COURIER’s unique method of boosting news on social media had a positive, statistically significant impact on voter turnout in the 2021 Virginia state election. There were two kinds of news tested on voters: local coverage of the Virginia 2021 gubernatorial race and candidates and localized coverage of federal policy solutions. These kinds of localized political news increased voter turnout by 0.2%. This experiment was tested on a pool of roughly 1 million Virginia voters on social media from September to November, 2021.


Texas voters view the clean energy transition as a net positive for the state economy, and most want to see their state leadership strengthen regulations on utilities and fossil fuel companies. 65% of Texans agree that state leaders such as Governor Greg Abbott and Attorney General Ken Paxton didn’t do enough to protect consumers with high energy bills following Winter Storm Uri, and two-thirds (67%) believe that the federal government should investigate possible price gouging by power companies during the storm. Additionally, only 35% believe that the Texas state government is doing enough to prepare the state for the impacts of climate change. The clear majority (64%) support more regulations on power companies and oil and gas producers “given the disruptions to the power grid and high energy prices caused by Winter Storm Uri in February 2021.” And by a 56%-34% margin, Texans side more with an argument that “regulations on energy companies need to be stronger in Texas to ensure power stays on and to protect Texas consumers from high prices” than a competing argument that “regulations on energy companies are an overstep of the government, don’t usually deliver the benefits they promise, and are not worth the cost.” Importantly, the poll also finds that more Texans believe that the clean energy transition will improve Texas’s economy (47%) than worsen it (35%).