Public Resource

Poll: Differences in Adults’ Concern and Perceptions of Climate Threats, Environmental Injustice

Morning Consult for WE ACT for Environmental Justice & Environmental Defense Fund
10-23-2020

Survey of Black, Hispanic, and white adults sought to measure concern for and perception of the impacts of climate change and other environmental threats like pollution, flooding, and storms, how these threats impact different racial/ethnic groups, and how adults’ views on these issues vary by race and ethnicity. Key findings include:

  • Black adults (60%) are nearly twice as likely as white adults (32%) to say they are very concerned about air pollution in their local community.
  • A majority of Americans (70%) are concerned about climate change, but Hispanic adults (68%) and Black adults (66%) are more likely than white adults (53%) to say climate change is a major problem.
  • Hispanic (50%) and Black (41%) adults are more likely than white adults (36%) to say they’re very or somewhat familiar with the term “environmental injustice.” While 51% of Black adults and 48% of Hispanic adults view environmental injustice as a major problem in the U.S., only 33% of white adults hold the same view, a significantly lower percentage.
  • Black adults (60%) and Hispanic adults (61%) are significantly more likely than white adults (53%) to say they experience a lot + some exposure to pollution in their daily lives.
  • While majorities of white (51%), Black 63% and Hispanic (55%) adults all say that predominantly Black neighborhoods still experience the long-term effects of redlining (definitely + probably), there are still differences between these groups in the extent to which they believe Black neighborhoods experience these impacts. Black adults (46%) are significantly more likely than both white adults (20%) and Hispanic adults (24%) to say that predominantly Black neighborhoods definitely still experience the long-term effects of redlining.