Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

A Decade Of Successes Against Fossil Fuel Export Projects In Cascadia

Emily Moore, Fossil Fuels Transition. Sightline Institute
Research & Articles
05-31-2022

73% of initially planned oil, gas, and coal export projects in the region have been cancelled since 2012. Fossil fuel executives from dozens of companies once seemed to be salivating over the idea of exporting massive quantities of gas, oil, and coal from the Cascadia coast—but local communities, Tribes, environmentalists, and local governments rejected calls to turn Cascadia into a fossil fuel export terminal. They protested projects’ abrogation of Indigenous sovereignty, the risk of oil spills and damage to sensitive ecosystems, the pollution spewing from coal trains, the climate harms of extracting, transporting, and burning hydrocarbons, and the safety hazards of transporting flammable fuels through populated areas—and for the most part, they’ve won. Since 2012, fossil fuel interests have schemed more than 50 large projects to export coal, oil, gas, or their derivatives from Cascadia’s coast in British Columbia, Oregon, and Washington, and today, 40 of those—a whopping 73%—have been canceled by project backers who faced local opposition, see-sawing energy prices, and regulatory hurdles.

This resource showcases entry points for those interested in working with Indigenous communities or strengthening existing work. The goal of this project was to inform and support non-Indigenous conservation groups and conservation and environmental funders’ staff and boards working with Indigenous communities. Recognizing that when we need to learn new information, we often seek out others we know who have undergone similar learning, this guide attempts to recount different journeys taken by organizations and staff. There are two general paths: the journeys of non-Indigenous organizations and funders to work with Indigenous communities or governments and the journeys of Indigenous people, non-profits, and government employees to work with non-Indigenous environmental and conversation organizations and/or funders. Each participant reviewed their organization’s draft for accuracy and clarity, with many providing content.

Applying an Alaska Native Lens to Climate Sovereignty, Economic Justice, and Healing

Ruth Miller, Meda Dewitt, and Margi Dashevksy. Non-Profit Quarterly
Research & Articles
11-15-2021

The Alaska Just Transition Collective is working to build a solidarity economy that will help Alaska move towards a just transition that cultivates grassroots processes incorporating indigenous sovereignty and stories from the land. Indigenous economic frameworks for redistributing wealth and resources must inform an approach to economic recovery. Traditional indigenous economic frameworkers ensure the health and well-being of the community and center the concept of reciprocity. 

Why Intersectional Stories Are Key to Helping the Communities We Serve

Annie Neimand, Natalie Asorey, Ann Christiano, and Zakyree Wallace. University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications. Stanford Social Innovation Review
Tips & How-Tos
09-28-2021

Many people communicating for social change are exploring how to tell diverse and inclusive stories that center marginalized communities while building understanding about how inequality persists. Intersectionality is an important tool to help us tell great stories that help us understand systemic issues. Five guiding principles to telling intersectional stories: Show, don’t tell; Provide historical context; Uplift the voices of marginalized people; Tell whole stories; and, Radically reimagine the world.

  

GenGND Conversation with Kaniela Ing

Generation Green New Deal podcast
Research & Articles
06-23-2021

Hawaiian organizer and strategist Kaniela Ing describes his theory of politics in this podcast episode. Kaniela is the Climate Justice Director with People’s Action, former state legislator, and former candidate for U.S. Congress. He argues that building power only happens through organizing, and insider lobbying only works to “wield” power, even though traditional advocacy organizations often view power only through lobbying. Kaniela says that growing up in a working-class, conservative household showed him that progressive organizers need to be understanding and empathetic and can win working-class Republicans over to progressive causes. He also describes (harmful) capitalist, colonial influences on Hawaiian local economies.             

Research & Articles
03-31-2021

Increasing accessibility, affordability, and reliability of public transit is imperative for BIPOC, low-income people, those living in rural areas, seniors, youth, and people with disabilities. COVID-19 exacerbated transportation inaccessibility because of limited routes and slashed service times. It also posed significant threats to transit workers who were not given adequate protection. Transit agencies must have safeguards in place to combat the negative effects of future pandemics as well as climate change. Such policies include better sick and family leave policies for transit drivers and electrification of the transportation sector to meet climate goals.             

Resilience Before Disaster: The Need to Build Equitable, Community-Driven Social Infrastructure

Zach Lou, Amee Raval, Marguerite Young & Sam Appel for Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN), SEIU California, SEIU 2015 & BlueGreen Alliance
Research & Articles
12-21-2020

California and the US are increasingly beset by climate-fueled disasters like wildfires, extreme heat, and power blackouts. These events put additional stress on frayed hard and social infrastructure systems, and disproportionately impact working-class communities of color. To adapt to these changes, society must update our notion of disaster response to increase resilience in these systems before disasters strike. This report offers two models for this response: 1) building and normalizing resilience hubs where community members gather and organize both in good times and bad, and 2) increasing in-home resilience by recognizing homecare workers as effective agents for assisting vulnerable populations and bridging authorities and the frontlines. The report goes on to recommend specific ways to set up resilience hubs, train care workers, and develop forward-thinking emergency response plans to avert human disasters after natural disasters.

Fueling the Fire: Why Any Fossil Fuel Industry Bailout Will be Disastrous for Communities of Color

Dieynabou Barry, Parthership for Working Families; Robert Gailbraith, Public Accountability Project/Little Sis, Derek Seidman, Public Accountability Project/Little Sis, Ericka Thi Patterson, Action Center on Race & the Economy
Research & Articles
12-17-2020

This report looks at the intersection of pollution from refining and burning fossil fuels, repiratory diseases caused or exacerbated by this pollution, the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and race and racial inequality in the United States. It makes the case that the CARES Act constitutes a bailout of the dirty energy sector that spent more to prop-up the fossil fuel industry than it did on health care supplies and investments, even as this industry contributes to the adverse health outcomes from the COVID-19 pandemic in communities of color. The report's key findings also link large financial sector players like big banks, asset management companies, private equity and insurance companies to the chain of carbon and chemical emissions that have disproprotionately negative impacts on communities of color and low-income communities.            

We Make The Future Messaging Guide

Race Class Narrative Action
Research & Articles
09-01-2020

The We Make the Future Messaging Guide is for campaigners, researchers, and all people who want to persuade others to take action to confront the challenges of a changing climate. The guide is based on rigorous research into perception and persuasion, and provide specific recommendations to engage base constituencies and persuade the middle (or people who haven't spent a lot of time thinking about specific solutions). The core of this work is the Race Class Narrative, an approach that weaves together economic empowerment, racial justice, climate justice, and gender equity, using language proven to work to mobilize and persuade people to take action.  

This is a how-to guide. It provides guidance on:

  • What to say and, crucially, what not to say
  • How to weave together the rights words and the right narrative
  • How to link related issues such as racial justice and climate justice within all your communications and calls-to-action 
  • Specific ways to use these messages on email, social media, and via text message  

Mobilizing an Indigenous Green New Deal

Pennelys Droz and Julian Brave Noisecat
Research & Articles
08-17-2020

The NDN Collective offers reflections and amendments to the Green New Deal platform, including:

  • Calling for the rejection of "netzero emissions" language, which has long been utilized to advance carbon-trading schemes. 
  • Clarifying language around “green infrastructure” and “renewable clean energy” whcih has been utilized to describe various carbon capture mechanisms, nuclear energy production, and large hydroelectric dams.
  • Supporting the necessity of resistance to extractive industries and infrastructure expansion.