Texas

Poll: Texas Voters Want to Transition to Clean Energy

A  statewide survey to assess the attitudes of likely Texas voters (including an oversample of Latino voters) toward climate change, pollution, and transitioning to clean energy revealed key insights, including:

  • Across party lines, voters are overwhelmingly concerned (85%) about air and water pollution.
  • 67% are concerned about climate change, with Latino (82%) and Black (80%) voters expressing the highest levels of concern.
  • Voters also agree (61%) that there is still time to come together as a state and country to take the actions that are necessary to address climate change and leave a better world for generations to come. Agreement is highest (72%) among Latino voters.
  • A strong majority (59%) also would like to see their leaders support clean energy industries to reduce carbon emissions and ensure Texas remains America’s energy leader, with support highest among Black (77%) and Latino (66%) voters.
  • A message that resonates across party lines is that Texas can face tough problems and can leverage its status as a national and global energy leader to become a champion of a new global energy economy.
  • 83% agree that Texas should make sure no oil and gas workers are left behind as America transitions away from fossil fuels and toward clean energy. 
  • A majority also think it is “Very important” or “Somewhat important” to include proposals for job training (89% important), new jobs in clean energy (87% important), pensions for retired workers (85% important), financial assistance for new degrees or trade certifications (83%), and buyouts for workers within five years of retirement (78%) in this transition bill.
  • Texas voters also support closing the revolving door of government officials becoming lobbyists for the fossil fuel industry, with a majority of Texans across parties (52%) supporting a proposal that would prevent former lawmakers from becoming lobbyists for the oil and gas industry immediately after leaving office. 

Poll: After Historic Outages, Texans Favor Solar, Wind and Other Clean Energy

Polling research shows that after historic power outages in February 2021, most Texans are in favor of the state producing more renewable energy and reducing their dependency on fossil fuels. 
- About six in 10 Texas voters say that the state should add solar (65%) and wind (58%) energy resources. There was less support for natural gas (45%), nuclear (28%), and coal (20%). 
- 30% of Texas voters strongly agree and 26% somewhat agree that the primary goal of Texas’ energy policy should be achieving 100% clean power. 
- 45% of Texas voters strongly agree and 32% somewhat agree that being a leader in clean energy innovation is important to Texas’s future.
             

Poll: Investing in American Clean Energy to Build the Industries of the Future

Key findings of a survey (phone and online) of US voters, with oversamples in key states include:

  • Voters across the political spectrum overwhelmingly support government investments in clean energy technologies in order to rebuild the economy (77%), create good jobs (76%), and eliminate the carbon emissions that cause climate change (75%). 
  • There's a widespread belief (75%) that investing in clean energy technologies will have economic benefits – including for "regular people." 
  • And also that by developing new clean technologies, we can replace many of the manufacturing and other blue-collar jobs that the country has lost over the last few decades (72%)
  • Strong support for various approaches to boost and develop specific clean energy technologies such as clean steel and cement, clean jet fuels, and energy storage and transmission.
  • Voters support investing $75 billion in clean energy tech RD&D as part of the upcoming infrastructure bill.         

Poll: Following Mass Power Failures in Texas, Over Half of Voters Say State Needs to Connect Its Grid to Others

  • 56% of U.S. voters say Texas should connect its electric grid with those of other regions, while 24% said the state should continue its independent operation.
  • Roughly 2 in 5 voters say Texas utilities, the state’s energy regulator and state government are “very responsible” for last week’s energy crisis.
  • Democrats were more likely to say they believe Texas should connect to other regions than retain its current model (71% to 13%), while a plurality of Republicans said the same (41% to 36%).

Voters Support the THRIVE Agenda

Polling done by Data For Progress in 11 states in August 2020 and released in September 2020 shows widespread popularity of the THRIVE Agenda, a legislative package for economic renewal with eight pillars that centers racial, economic, and climate justice. Polling was done in these states: Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin. 

A majority of voters in each state support each of the eight pillars as do a majority of the voters in 40 competitive House races that were also polled.

Equitable and Just Hurricane and Disaster Preparedness Amid COVID-19

This report highlights the intersectional impacts of (climate-fueled) hurricanes and COVID on Gulf South and Southeast, offering recommendations for how Congress, the federal government, and local governments can support equitable disaster preparedness, response, and rebuilding, including:

  • Help cities, communities, and states prepare for and equitably rebuild after disasters by developing disaster rebuilding plans that prioritize affordable housing and resilient infrastructure
  • Develop bold, equitable, and comprehensive plans to cut pollution and build resilience to climate change
  • Increase federal funding for the Environmental Career Worker Training Program
  • Create and capitalize an Healthy Communities and Resilient Infrastructure Fund

How does the American public perceive climate disasters?

Different parts of the country see various kinds of extreme weather as most concerning, perceptions which are largely in line with actual major disasters that have occurred in those regions. This report provides concern profiles for the 18 largest states, drawing on survey data from 2018 and 2019. Over half of Americans see such extreme weather events posting a high or moderate risk to their community in the coming decade, and two thirds see a climate link to US weather (though only a third think climate affects our weather "a lot").

Poll: In time of COVID, two-thirds of Americans want climate action

Americans are worried about "triple threat" of hurricanes, COVID, & climate change. 52% of Black Americans and 49% of Latinos/Latinas say they are more worried about hurricane season this year amidst the pandemic. Half of adults in southeastern coastal states say they are more worried about hurricane season this year and 66% say addressing climate change should be a priority.