Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Climate Doom to Messy Hope: Climate Healing & Resilience

Meghan Wise for UBC Climate Hub's Climate Wellbeing Engagement Network
Research & Articles
06-12-2024

Grounded in a commitment to fostering deeper understandings and connections, this theory-to-practice handbook aims to support mindful and proactive navigation of the escalating impacts of climate change on individual and community mental health and wellbeing.

Voters Say Climate Anxiety Negatively Impacts Their Daily Lives

Catherine Fraser and Grace Adcox. Data for Progress
Research & Articles
05-29-2024

Most voters believe that climate change will impact their health and where they live, and more than two-thirds support the Community Mental Wellness and Resilience Act after reading about it. Nearly seven in ten voters (69% support / 24% oppose) say that they support the Community Mental Wellness and Resilience Act. Support for the bill spans partisan lines, with nearly nine in ten Democrats (88%), two-thirds of independents (67%), and around half of Republicans (52%) in favor of it. Climate anxiety is highly relatable, with most voters saying that climate change negatively impacts their plans for the future. The majority of voters (55%) say that their feelings about climate change have some kind of negative impact on their planning for the future. Younger voters in particular expect that their lives will be impacted by climate change. Nearly two-thirds of voters under 45 say that climate change will impact their health (65%) and where they live (64%), and most voters under 45 (54%) believe that it will impact their finances as well.

Environmental Polling Roundup - May 17th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
05-17-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new national polling on oil and gas accountability, clean energy and infrastructure, and young voters, plus new polling in Florida on the state’s approach to climate change. 

 

HEADLINES

Climate change and the environment rank among President Biden’s biggest issue advantages over Trump with young voters, with clear room to grow. Voters under the age of 30 trust Biden by 16 points over Trump (58% Biden / 42% Trump) to protect the climate and environment.

Environmental Polling Roundup - May 3rd, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
05-03-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on polluter accountability, Big Oil misinformation, climate resilience, and the Inflation Reduction Act.

 

HEADLINES

Poll: Generation Alpha" Taking Up the Challenge to Adapt and Act on Climate

MassINC Polling Group for the Museum of Science in Boston
Research & Articles
04-22-2024

A recent survey asked middle and high school students nationwide a variety of questions about climate change, environment, and their feelings about the future. Among the key findings: 

  • 72% of respondents say climate change is already impacting their lives, and 53% believe it will be a major problem over the course of their lives. Over three-quarters (77%) think climate change will require radical changes to how we all live. These percentages are even higher among students of color.

Research & Articles
04-17-2024

Young Americans express the greatest concerns about climate change, and are particularly likely to take action in response. Roughly half of young Americans aged 18-34 (49%) say that they are “very” or “extremely” concerned about climate change, which is the highest of any age group. Additionally, 18-34 year-olds are far less likely than other age groups to dismiss the problem by saying that they are “not very” or “not at all concerned” about it (just 13%).

How should we talk to kids about climate change? The world is beautiful, but the world is changing—and you can play a part in the change. Mary Annaïse Heglar's first book is out today, and it's a children's book about climate change. It's the first of three climate books Mary has coming out in the near future (the other two are a novel, called Troubled Waters, and an essay collection of Black writers on climate). She has been busy writing up a storm since we wrapped up Hot Take (and we've roped her into editing stories for Drilled, too).