Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Environmental Polling Roundup - November 18th, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
11-18-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including lots of new polling on climate change and the environment as issues in the midterm elections.

The 2022 Midterm Voter Election Poll

African American Research Collaborative
Research & Articles
11-14-2022

Midterm voters of color are the most likely to view climate change as an “urgent problem” and to say that the Inflation Reduction Act was a motivating factor in their vote. 73% of midterm voters say they support the Inflation Reduction Act when it’s described as “the largest investment ever in clean energy in an effort to reduce toxic air and carbon pollution,” including 90% of Black voters and 83% of Latino voters. 62% of midterm voters say that climate change is an “urgent problem we must address now,” including 77% of Black voters and 68% of Latino voters.

Environmental Polling Roundup - November 11th, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
11-11-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new national polling about climate change as a factor in people’s midterm vote choices and new polling on energy and carbon removal in Wyoming.

Wyoming voters have positive attitudes about fossil fuels but are open to mitigating their impact with carbon removal sites in the state. Wyoming voters express the most favorable views toward traditional energy sources like natural gas (91 percent favorable), oil (84 percent favorable), and coal (78 percent favorable). Nuclear energy (71 percent favorable) enjoys roughly the same favorability as solar energy (69 percent favorable), while wind energy lags relatively behind (52 percent favorable). Notably, several respondents express very strong negative sentiments toward wind turbines — especially regarding their appearance — in an open-ended prompt regarding any additional views toward alternative energy sources. Wyoming voters are open-minded about carbon removal. After reading a brief description, Wyoming voters support building CDR sites in the state by a +50-point margin. There is broad support across party lines from majorities of Democrats (84 percent), Independents (69 percent), and Republicans (65 percent).

Research & Articles
11-09-2022

Republican pollster reports that climate change voters helped fuel Democrats’ overperformance in the election. Democratic candidates won 88% of voters who say they are concerned about climate change.

Environmental Polling Roundup - November 4th, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
11-04-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on the Inflation Reduction Act, the factors voters blame for high gas prices, and the issues that voters are prioritizing the most in the midterms.

Poll: On the Inflation Reduction Act, Voters Have Heard Very Little

Alvin Gunnion and Sabrina Jacobs. Data for Progress
Research & Articles
11-03-2022

Voters still know little about the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA). Less than half know that the bill was passed and only around one-third know that it will boost clean energy. Far fewer than 50% of voters know that each policy component of the IRA is indeed in the bill. Only about 24% of voters have seen a political advertisement that mentions the IRA.

Research & Articles
11-02-2022

Most young adults in Europe want to be involved in action to tackle climate change and have little faith in current leaders to take significant climate action. Survey results show that almost one in 10 respondents said they would be prepared to break the law to tackle climate change. A large majority (81%) agreed that we need a social transformation – changing our economy, how we travel, live, produce and consume – in order to tackle climate change. However, there were also some contradictions and gaps in their understanding of the issue: most did not draw a connection between someone’s gender or racialization and their likelihood of being impacted by climate change. Smaller “workshop” conversations showed concerned young adults: agree that climate change is a systemic problem but may struggle to know what the solutions are and to see themselves in them; think that the status quo isn’t working and want to see big changes, but frequently feel powerless to bring this about; care about social justice issues like racism and sexism, but don’t readily connect them to climate change; think responsibility lies at the top but don’t believe their government will do the right thing; want more balance in who has power and voice, but don’t like language about taking power or resources away from anyone; see that climate change has roots in the past but many want to look forward rather than back; believe some actors are more culpable than others but often raised questions about the theory and reality of paying compensation for loss and damages resulting from climate change.

Environmental Polling Roundup - October 28th, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
10-28-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on the obstacles to climate action and proposed solutions; a battleground state poll about oil and gas companies’ role in spiking energy prices; new polling on the SITE Act and expansion of the U.S. electric grid; and a study analyzing the impact of messaging about the scientific consensus on climate change.

Voters want to see the U.S. electric grid expanded, and widely support the SITE Act after learning about it. 74% of all voters believe it’s urgent to develop new energy infrastructure in the U.S. 74% support expediting the permitting process for power lines. 71% support the SITE Act after reading about it, which would expedite the permitting process. 55% of voter support giving the federal government more authority over interstate power lines.