Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Environmental Polling Roundup - July 19th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
07-19-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on Americans’ attitudes about climate change, views on different energy sources, and beliefs about the links between fossil fuel pollution and health problems.

Climate Change in the American Mind: Beliefs & Attitudes, Spring 2024

Anthony Leiserowitz, Edward Maibach, Seth Rosenthal et al. Yale University and George Mason University
Research & Articles
07-16-2024

Steady majorities of Americans recognize that global warming is happening and caused by humans, and a rising number say that they’ve personally been affected. 70% of Americans recognize that global warming is happening. 66% of Americans recognize that global warming is affecting weather in the United States. 59% of Americans recognize that global warming is caused mostly by humans. 63% of Americans disagree with the argument that it’s “too late” to do anything about global warming. 60% of Americans agree that global warming is an “economic issue”.

Environmental Polling Roundup - July 12th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
07-12-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on the clean energy transition, the personal impacts of climate change, climate change as an issue in the presidential race, and methane pollution + a new analysis of the ways that Americans’ climate attitudes change over time.

Research & Articles
07-11-2024

National TV news largely failed to connect Hurricane Beryl, the first hurricane of the 2024 Atlantic season, to climate change. From July 1-8, corporate broadcast and cable news networks aired a combined 701 minutes across 343 segments about Hurricane Beryl, with only 15 segments (4%) mentioning climate change. Cable news networks — CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC — aired a combined 520 minutes across 234 segments about Hurricane Beryl, with 9 mentioning climate change. Corporate broadcast TV networks — ABC, CBS, and NBC — aired a combined 181 minutes across 109 segments about Hurricane Beryl, with 6 mentioning climate change. 32 segments mentioned rapid intensification, a climate signal.

Why the climate movement is actually close to winning

Nick Engelfried. Waging Nonviolence
Research & Articles
07-08-2024

Despite widespread discouragement among climate activists, a tested blueprint for successful movements shows immense progress being made. There are patterns movements follow as they expand from the political fringes to start shaping national decisions. One framework for identifying these is the eight-stage “Movement Action Plan,” or MAP, articulated by activist and scholar Bill Moyer in 1987. According to Moyer, during Stage One of the MAP unjust conditions “are maintained by the policies of public and private powerholders, and a majority of public opinion.” During the MAP’s Stage One, the status quo is reinforced by the public’s misconception that if something were seriously amiss, officially sanctioned forms of advocacy like lobbying should be sufficient to rectify the problem. The next stage of the MAP involves conditions aligning to create a political environment where the birth of a broad-based movement becomes possible—this may involve national or global events over which activists have little control. Then, all successful movements experience a moment when they enter the public consciousness and become a potent political force, usually after a trigger event that grabs people’s attention. The climate movement has already progressed through most stages of the MAP can provide activists with a sense of clarity about what work has already been done.

Research & Articles
07-03-2024

An analysis of the top 100 EV-related posts on US political pages found that the vast majority of them were critical of the technology. Between January 1 and June 1, 81% of the Facebook posts analyzed were related to sales setbacks, performance or charging issues, or other negative press. These posts had over 1.3 million interactions, accounting for 79% of total interactions related to EVs. Posts related to automakers or car rental companies rolling back their commitments to selling EVs made up over a third of this content. Another popular topic focused on performance issues sometimes exacerbated by cold weather, which made up 20% of posts related to EVs. Nearly three quarters (74%) of EV-related posts on nonaligned pages (neither left-leaning or right-leaning) had a negative framing. These posts generated 83% of all interactions on EV-related posts from nonaligned pages. Out of the top 100 posts related to EVs on right-leaning pages, 95% were negative. Of the negative posts, 43% were related to automakers or car rental companies rolling back their commitments to selling EVs -- these posts earned over 477,000 interactions.

Research & Articles
07-02-2024

There is a clear and urgent opportunity for the health sector to inform and support Americans on climate change as a matter of health. 70% of Americans have heard that climate change can affect their health. However, more Americans acknowledge the health impacts on others (69%) than themselves (46%), likely due to cognitive dissonance. Most Americans (69%) trust health professionals for climate health information and, 61% want to learn how to protect their health from adverse climate effects such as poor air quality, extreme heat, or severe storms. By disseminating accurate information and guidance across a variety of mediums (including direct conversations), the health sector can empower Americans to protect their health from climate-related risks and advocate for broader systemic changes to address climate change in inclusive, just, and equitable ways.

Environmental Polling Roundup - June 28th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
06-28-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including lots of new polling and research on extreme heat, polling on climate change and clean energy as issues in the 2024 election, and new polling on the American Climate Corps.

Poll: Understanding pro-climate voters in the United States

Jennifer Carman, Matthew Ballew, Marija Verner et al. Yale University and George Mason University
Research & Articles
06-27-2024

“Pro-climate voters” make up a large share of the electorate, are eager to vote, and are enthusiastic about the IRA. These “pro-climate voters” make up 37% of all registered voters nationwide, and therefore have the potential to make a big impact in the races for president and other offices this fall. Notably, an additional 25% of registered voters also prefer a candidate who supports climate action even though they do not say that global warming is a very important voting issue to them. Liberal Democrats are the group most likely to be pro-climate voters (70%), followed by urban residents (47%), Moderate/Conservative Democrats (47%), those with a Bachelor’s degree or higher (45%), and Hispanics/Latinos (43%).

The media is still falling short on climate

Emily Atkin and Arielle Samuelson. HEATED
Research & Articles
06-27-2024

HEATED analyzed 133 breaking news stories about recent climate-fueled weather in the United States. The results were dismal—but there were some bright spots. Only 44 percent of digital breaking news articles mentioned the climate crisis or global warming. Stories about heat waves fared slightly better, with 52 percent mentioning climate change. Only 25 percent of stories about extreme rainfall mentioned climate change. Even fewer stories about this month’s climate-fueled extreme weather explained to readers why the climate crisis is happening in the first place. Of 133 articles about unprecedented heat and flash floods, only 15 articles—or 11 percent—mentioned fossil fuels, the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. Only one article, from the BBC, mentioned deforestation. No articles mentioned animal agriculture. Yet despite the dismal numbers overall, some news outlets stood out for consistently mentioning climate change in all their breaking heat and rainfall articles this month. Those outlets were numerous, but included NPR, Vox, Axios, the BBC, and Agence France-Presse (AFP).