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Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

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Environmental Polling Roundup - July 19th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
07-19-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on Americans’ attitudes about climate change, views on different energy sources, and beliefs about the links between fossil fuel pollution and health problems.

Environmental Polling Roundup - July 12th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
07-12-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on the clean energy transition, the personal impacts of climate change, climate change as an issue in the presidential race, and methane pollution + a new analysis of the ways that Americans’ climate attitudes change over time.

Research & Articles
07-03-2024

An analysis of the top 100 EV-related posts on US political pages found that the vast majority of them were critical of the technology. Between January 1 and June 1, 81% of the Facebook posts analyzed were related to sales setbacks, performance or charging issues, or other negative press. These posts had over 1.3 million interactions, accounting for 79% of total interactions related to EVs. Posts related to automakers or car rental companies rolling back their commitments to selling EVs made up over a third of this content. Another popular topic focused on performance issues sometimes exacerbated by cold weather, which made up 20% of posts related to EVs. Nearly three quarters (74%) of EV-related posts on nonaligned pages (neither left-leaning or right-leaning) had a negative framing. These posts generated 83% of all interactions on EV-related posts from nonaligned pages. Out of the top 100 posts related to EVs on right-leaning pages, 95% were negative. Of the negative posts, 43% were related to automakers or car rental companies rolling back their commitments to selling EVs -- these posts earned over 477,000 interactions.

Environmental Polling Roundup - June 28th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
06-28-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including lots of new polling and research on extreme heat, polling on climate change and clean energy as issues in the 2024 election, and new polling on the American Climate Corps.

Research & Articles
06-27-2024

Most Americans want more renewable energy, but support has dipped. Interest in electric vehicles has also declined. The shares who favor expanding solar and wind power farms are down 12 percentage points and 11 points, respectively, since 2020, driven by sharp drops in support among Republicans. Today, 29% of Americans say they would consider an EV for their next purchase, down from 38% in 2023. Still, a majority of Americans (63%) support the goal of the U.S. taking steps to become carbon neutral by 2050. When asked which is the greater priority, far more Americans continue to say the country should focus on developing renewable energy than fossil fuel sources (65% vs. 34%). A fairly modest share of U.S. adults (25%) say it’s extremely or very important to them personally to limit their own “carbon footprint.”

Poll: Voters Express Support for Public Service Organizations That Address Climate Change

Catherine Fraser, Margo Kenyon, and Grace Adcox. Data for Progress
Research & Articles
06-26-2024

Voters agree that there is a role for national service programs in the fight against climate change, and continue to widely back the American Climate Corps when they learn about it. Voters support the American Climate Corps by an overwhelming 77%-16% margin when provided with a description. The ACC is particularly popular with young voters aged 18-34, with 83% supporting it. By a 53%-35% margin, voters side more with a positive argument in favor of the ACC than a negative argument against it. Young people are most attracted to the ideas of earning a living wage and making a difference in their community.

Poll: Amidst Record-Breaking Heat Dome, 4 in 5 Voters Want FEMA to Respond to Extreme Heat Disasters

Catherine Fraser, Margo Kenyon, and Grace Adcox. Data for Progress
Research & Articles
06-26-2024

Heat continues to rank as Americans’ top extreme weather concern, and voters overwhelmingly support measures to help Americans cope with it – including expanded disaster relief funding, investments in cooling infrastructure, and new requirements for landlords. 80% of voters support FEMA adding extreme heat and wildfire smoke to the list of disasters to which they respond and allocate disaster relief funding. 80% of voters support their state or municipality investing in cool roofs and cool pavements. 79% of voters support requiring landlords to provide renters with air conditioning or indoor cooling in areas that experience extreme heat events. 79% of voters support programs that specifically invest in cooling infrastructure for marginalized communities.

Research & Articles
06-25-2024

This June 25 briefing features recent research on multiple climate politics topics. Rural voters support clean energy but are skeptical about moving away from fossil fuels. Climate’s effects on weather and on Americans’ wallets outperform other climate messages. All topics covered include renewable energy siting (courtesy of NRDC); rural clean energy attitudes (courtesy of the Rural Climate Partnership); new and different techniques to effectively communicate about climate change (courtesy of the Climate Action Campaign); and Americans' prioritization of different environmental issues and the ways that environmental priorities differ across audiences (courtesy of the Partnership Project Innovation Hub).

Voters recognize methane as a pollutant and support policies to address methane pollution, but most don’t associate it with the oil and gas industry. Most voters (68%) say that they’ve heard little or nothing about methane gas, but the majority (64%) also rate it as at least a “minor” problem for the climate – including 38% who call methane gas a “major problem” for the climate. When asked to select two phrases that they most associate with methane gas, voters are much more likely to connect it with “cows and other livestock” (44%) and with “landfills” (33%) than with “fossil fuels” (18%) or “oil and gas extraction” (16%). Further demonstrating how voters are at least vaguely aware of methane pollution, around three in ten associate methane gas with the terms “air pollution” (31%) and “greenhouse gas” (29%). After reading that agriculture, energy, and waste are the economic sectors that contribute most to U.S. methane emissions, large majorities support government action to reduce methane emissions from each of these sectors: 81% support government action to reduce methane emissions from waste (landfills and wastewater facilities); 75% support government action to reduce methane emissions from energy (oil and gas); 67% support government action to reduce methane emissions from agriculture (cows and other livestock).

Environmental Polling Roundup - June 14th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
06-14-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including a new wave of Yale and George Mason’s long-running “Climate Change in the American Mind” survey, new battleground polling on climate change and clean energy in the presidential race, and new polling on sustainable aquaculture.