Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Latino Climate Justice Framework

22 Latino/a/x organizations
Research & Articles
10-01-2022

Climate justice for Latino Americans means centering policies that achieve environmental, energy, and economic justice together. Latino/a/x households pay disproportionately high energy costs, low-income, Latino/a/x households and communities have so far been left behind in the transition to clean energy, and Latino/a/x workers need a pathway to clean energy jobs. Therefore, we need to invest with justice in clean energy, accelerate the transition to renewable energy (i.e., wind, solar, geothermal and small-scale hydropower), and advance economic equity and opportunity for Latino/a/x workers. This resource further details these problems and policy and political solutions, as related to transit, jobs, fossil fuel drilling, climate adaptation, clean water, voting rights, conservation, and more.

Harness climate concerns shared by people of color. This survey of people of color about their attitudes toward climate change reveal that they are paying close attention to the issue and are motivated to get involved with climate solutions. The results show that people of color feel a strong sense of urgency to tackle climate change and are overwhelmingly more likely to support political candidates who prioritize the issue.

Research & Articles
09-30-2022

The group that most thinks Congress is out of touch with climate change is people who strongly disapprove of Joe Biden's job as president. More than half of every single demographic surveyed thinks Congress is out of touch on climate change. The exceptions include Democratic men, religious non-Protestants/Catholics, non-Christians, and people who strongly approve of President Joe Biden's job in general. But when broken down by age demographics, every age group from 18-to-24 to 75+ thought Congress wasn't doing a good job on climate.

Research & Articles
09-29-2022

The American public underestimates how much it agrees about climate change. While most Americans recognize the human causes of climate change and support action on the issue, less than half believe that most Americans also recognize the human causes of climate change. Educating Americans that they are part of the majority in recognizing the reality of human-caused climate change could create a positive feedback loop on public opinion by making people more comfortable discussing the issue, establishing climate awareness as a societal norm, and providing a permission structure for people who don’t feel that those around them care about the issue. The majority of Americans (63%) recognize that climate change is “entirely” or “mostly” caused by humans. 70% of Americans recognize that climate change is currently affecting the weather worldwide. 60% of Americans recognize that climate change is currently affecting the weather in their area. By a 65%-20% margin, Americans support tax credits for corporations that reduce carbon emissions. By a 64%-23% margin, Americans support increased government regulation on corporations’ carbon emissions.

Times/Siena Poll: Democrats Buoyed by Abortion and Trump

Lisa Lerer and Nate Cohn. New York Times
Research & Articles
09-16-2022

More education about the Inflation Reduction Act is needed in order to bolster public support for it. New polling by the New York Times and Siena finds that voters are split roughly evenly on the Inflation Reduction Act when they aren’t provided with any details about it (37% support / 32% oppose), while new polling by Navigator finds that voters support the bill by an overwhelming margin after reading a brief description of its major provisions (64% support / 26% oppose).

Support for the Inflation Reduction Act is stable. Voters continue to rank climate change among the top priorities for Biden and Congress; three in five attribute climate change to human activity. Importantly, there remains a strong public appetite for more federal action on climate. In fact, after inflation and the economy, climate change and the environment rank on par with or higher than any other issue priority for the national electorate. Voters support the Inflation Reduction Act by a greater than two-to-one margin (64% support / 26% oppose) after reading a one-sentence description of the bill and its major provisions. 60% of Americans agree that climate change is mostly a result of human activity.

Supporters of the Inflation Reduction Act are winning the public debate over it, but still need to help the public understand what’s in the bill. Polling on the Inflation Reduction Act has been very consistent in showing that Americans support the bill by wide margins when provided with even basic information about what’s included in it. New polling by Navigator further demonstrates that support for the Inflation Reduction Act has held steady as voters have grown increasingly familiar with it, though there is still ample room to raise awareness about what the bill covers. Two-thirds of voters (67%) support the Inflation Reduction Act after reading a brief, one-sentence description of it.

Michigan and Wisconsin voters widely support the Inflation Reduction Act and want more climate action on the state level. Additionally, large majorities in both states want to see their state expand clean energy and Wisconsin voters prefer a gubernatorial candidate who prioritizes climate change, pollution, and clean energy by a two-to-one margin over a candidate who doesn’t prioritize these issues. Michigan voters support the Inflation Reduction Act by a 64%-27% margin. 66% of Michigan want the state to produce more energy from clean energy sources such as wind and solar. Wisconsin voters support the Inflation Reduction Act by a 65%-29% margin. 65% of Wisconsin voters want the state to produce more energy from clean energy sources such as wind and solar. By a 62%-31% margin, Wisconsin voters prefer a gubernatorial candidate who prioritizes climate action, reducing pollution, and expanding clean energy over a candidate who doesn’t prioritize these issues.

Survey Says: Considerable Interest In Electric Vehicles Across Racial, Ethnic Demographics

Consumer Reports, Union of Concerned Scientists, EVNORE, and Green Latinos
Research & Articles
09-01-2022

Across all racial demographics, overall interest in purchasing EVs is high. Americans of color show at least as great a level of interest in purchasing an electric vehicle as white consumers: 33% of white, 38% of Black, 43% of Latino, and 52% of Asian Americans say they would “definitely” or “seriously consider” purchasing or leasing an EV as their next vehicle. For those individuals who identified charging as an issue limiting adoption, availability of publicly accessible charging remains a greater concern than convenience or long charging times. In terms of perceived cost barriers, more Black and Latino individuals identify maintenance and repair costs as a consideration holding them back from purchasing or leasing an EV (54% of Black and 48% of Hispanic respondents, compared with 37% of white respondents), while more white and Asian Americans for whom cost is an issue identify purchase price as the primary concern. Increasing affordable, accessible, reliable public EV charging infrastructure situated in safe locations would address all of the groups’ biggest concerns about EV charging.

Time to Put the Fossil-Fuel Industry Into Hospice

Andrew J. Hoffman and Douglas M. Ely. Stanford Social Innovation Review
Research & Articles
09-01-2022

If humanity is to survive the climate crisis, we must manage a just and orderly transition away from fossil fuels. Acknowledge the full scope of the problem. Recognize the limited scope of economic policy solutions. Accept that substantially reducing greenhouse-gas emissions presents an existential challenge for the industry. We face the challenge of managing “compassionate destruction,” in which we guide all the complex and expansive elements of the fossil-fuel sector through a just and orderly transition to a carbon-free economy. Bring about the end of the entire sector through corporate collaboration. Protect workers and avoid labor flight during transition. Overcome political and social resistance to change. Account for the full scope of the financial impact of the transition. Control the fate of products both used and unused. Protect indirect workers in related industries. Maintain justice and equity for all communities. Decommission, remediate, and repurpose dedicated infrastructure. Leverage the power of government. Overhaul business education as if people and the planet really matter.